Tag Archives: family law

Check List for Dos and Don’ts for Minnesota Divorcing Parties With Custody Issues-It’s All About the Children

This is a repost of what I think are good tips for working with the other parent during a Minnesota divorce or a Minnesota custody matter. Actually, these are good tips for all parents that may live apart.  THE LIST OF DOS 1. Do be civil and polite to your spouse especially in front of […]

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Tip: Save Time and Money in Your Minnesota Divorce by Getting All Information to Your Attorney

Want to save money in getting a divorce or in any other family law matter?  One of the best ways is to simply follow-though and provide your attorney with the information that he or she needs to draft the pleadings or settlement documents. Divorces require a lot of information upfront and even more information to […]

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Splitting the Federal Tax Refund in a Minnesota Divorce Case

Divorcing couples in Minnesota often file their taxes jointly.  Splitting the refund can be dicey especially if the parties are not cooperative with one another.   The IRS Form 8888 titled “Allocation of Refund”  is a handy device that allows divorcing parties who file jointly to direct his or her share of the refund into […]

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Minnesota Marital Property vs. Non-Marital Claims- Who Gets What?

You may have an idea of what property is yours or what property you are willing to share with your soon-to-be former spouse, but Minnesota law dictates how marital property and non-marital property differ. The old saying what’s mine is mine and what’s yours is mine doesn’t apply in a Minnesota divorce. Any person alleging a […]

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Minnesota Divorces and What To Do With the House?

Minnesota divorcing parties often own a home that carries a mortgage and maybe a second mortgage or equity line of credit. Since 2008, the equity in homes has deceased.  Some homes are upside down; that is, parties owe the bank more than the house is worth.  Some homes have recovered equity, but nowhere near the […]

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Minnesota Gray Divorces – The After 50 Minnesota Dissolution

Statistics for divorcing couples show that the majority of divorces filed are those involving folks older than 50 years.  Most of these couples have been married for at least 25 years or more; have raised their families; acquired many assets; and, maybe some debt.  They usually own a home and maybe a second home.  One spouse may have […]

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Minnesota Custody Evaluations Should be the Last Resort for Minnesota Divorcing Parents

When Minnesota parents who have joint children cannot agree upon custody, parenting time, or a parenting plan, then usually a custody evaluation is necessary. A custody evaluator is appointed by the Court or by agreement of the parties.   Custody evaluations  are the Court’s way of having a third-party do the necessary investigation and make a recommendation in […]

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Minnesota Divorce Flow Chart -A Visual Aid for Minnesota Family Law

Attorneys routinely deal with procedural matters in Court as part of the day-to-day-aspects of handling Minnesota family law cases. For most Minnesota divorcing parties or parties who have family legal matters that need a Minnesota family lawyer, it is confusing to sort out the different pathways that a case can follow through the system. The following flow […]

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Minnesota Unwed Fathers Online Resource is a Good Read.

  As a follow-up to my post about Minnesota unwed fathers establishing their parental rights, the following website is a good resource with relevant content and worth a look. http://www.lawhelpmn.org/resource/unmarried-fathers-guide-to-paternity-custody Kate Willmore, St. Cloud, MN, Divorce, Family, Fathers Rights Lawyer & Mediator (320) 217-6030  or kaw@katewillmorelaw.com http://www.katewillmorelaw.com

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Minnesota Unwed Father’s Legal Rights- Establishing Yourself as Dad

Minnesota grants sole custody of children born outside of marriage to mothers.  Dads have to establish their parental rights. Signing a recognition of parentage does not convey any parental rights;  having your name on the birth certificate or having the child assume your surname doesn’t grant you any parental rights; living together or having a […]

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